A Journal of the Plague Year

filler

Price:
$18.14
Stock:
Sold out

Description

Author: Defoe, Daniel

Color: Multicolor

Edition: Revised

Features:

  • Penguin Books

Number Of Pages: 336

EAN: 9780140437850

Release Date: 26-08-2003

Languages: English

Item Condition: UsedGood

Binding: Paperback

Details: Product Description “The surprise ‘must-read’ for people facing the Covid-19 epidemic.” —The Telegraph In 1665 the plague swept through London, claiming over 97,000 lives. Daniel Defoe was just five at the time of the plague, but he later called on his own memories, as well as his writing experience, to create this vivid chronicle of the epidemic and its victims.  A Journal (1722) follows Defoe's fictional narrator as he traces the devastating progress of the plague through the streets of London. Here we see a city transformed: some of its streets suspiciously empty, some—with crosses on their doors—overwhelmingly full of the sounds and smells of human suffering. And every living citizen he meets has a horrifying story that demands to be heard. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. Review “One of the most original and harrowing accounts of living through a virulent pandemic . . . as full of meaning about human suffering today as it was when it was written.” — The Daily Beast “A brilliant account of the last major outbreak of bubonic plague in Britain—and it can still educate readers three centuries later.” — BBC News “[A] classic of plague literature . . . Camus was inspired by this book in writing The Plague.” — The Jerusalem Post “So grimly immediate . . . you can practically smell the death and decay.” — The Guardian “A realistic account of the plague’s effects on [London]. Defoe’s novel still has the power to unsettle—like when he writes about families forced into quarantine due to an infected family member.” — Vulture "Within the texture of Defoe's prose, London becomes a living and suffering being." — Peter Ackroyd About the Author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731) had a variety of careers including merchant, soldier, secret agent, and political pamphleteer. He wrote economic texts, history, biography, crime, and, most famously, fiction, including Robinson Crusoe, Moll Flanders and Roxana. Cynthia Wall is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Virginia. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. It was about the Beginning of September 1664, that I, among the Rest of my Neighbours, heard in ordinary Discourse, that the Plague was returned again in Holland; for it had been very violent there, and particularly at Amsterdam and Roterdam, in the Year 1663, whether they say, it was brought, some said from Italy, others from the Levant among some Goods, which were brought home by their Turkey Fleet; others said it was brought from Candia; others from Cyprus. It mattered not, from whence it come; but all agreed, it was come into Holland again. We had no such thing as printed News Papers in those Days, to spread Rumours and Reports of Things; and to improve them by the Invention of Men, as I have lived to see practised since. But such things as these were gathered from the Letters of Merchants, and others, who corresponded abroad, and from them was handed about by Word of Mouth only; so that things did not spread instantly over the whole Nation, as they do now. But it seems that the Government had a true Account of it, and several Counsels were held about Ways to prevent its coming over; but all was kept very private. Hence it was, that this Rumour died off again, and People began to forget it, as a thing we were very little concerned in, and that we hoped was not true; till the latter End of November, or the Beginning of December 1664, when two Men, said to be French-men, died of the Plague in Long Acre, or rather at the upper End of Drury Lane. The Famil

Payment & Security

American Express Apple Pay Diners Club Discover Google Pay Mastercard PayPal Shop Pay Visa

Your payment information is processed securely. We do not store credit card details nor have access to your credit card information.

You may also like