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Description

Author: Slick, Grace

Number Of Pages: 384

EAN: 9780446523028

Release Date: 01-09-1998

Languages: English

Item Condition: UsedGood

Binding: Hardcover

Details: Product Description Grace Slick looks back on a lifetime of sex, drugs and rock & roll in Somebody to Love?, a wisecracking memoir featuring cameos by some mighty famous faces. As the lead singer of Jefferson Airplane (later Jefferson Starship and, still later, Starship), Slick had a ringside seat for some of the decade's most notorious high jinks--Haight-Ashbury, Woodstock, the sexual revolution, and of course, '60s drug culture. Put it this way: if the dormouse said feed your head, Slick did--again and again and again. Which leads to this memoir's principal shortcoming: it's hard to document the most important decade of your life if you can't remember it. Still, even if she's a little fuzzy on some of the details, the anecdotes alone are worth the price of admission, from the time Slick and Abbie Hoffman plotted to dose Richard Nixon to her surreal sexual encounter with a nearly autistic-seeming Jim Morrison: "Although I knew there was some pattern of events going on in his head that connected what I'd just said to what he was thinking, it never made sense." Now sober and nearing her 60s, Slick frets over her aging body, campaigns against biomedical research, and feeds the raccoons in her back yard. But she hasn't lost any of her famous feistiness. This is the same woman who flashed her breasts at photographers, pulled her skirt over her head at concerts, and even once, "having ingested the entire contents of the minibar in my hotel room," stuck her fingers up an audience member's nose. Grace Slick may have mellowed, but bless her heart, she's still running off her mouth. --Mary Park From Amazon Grace Slick looks back on a lifetime of sex, drugs and rock & roll in Somebody to Love?, a wisecracking memoir featuring cameos by some mighty famous faces. As the lead singer of Jefferson Airplane (later Jefferson Starship and, still later, Starship), Slick had a ringside seat for some of the decade's most notorious high jinks--Haight-Ashbury, Woodstock, the sexual revolution, and of course, '60s drug culture. Put it this way: if the dormouse said feed your head, Slick did--again and again and again. Which leads to this memoir's principal shortcoming: it's hard to document the most important decade of your life if you can't remember it. Still, even if she's a little fuzzy on some of the details, the anecdotes alone are worth the price of admission, from the time Slick and Abbie Hoffman plotted to dose Richard Nixon to her surreal sexual encounter with a nearly autistic-seeming Jim Morrison: "Although I knew there was some pattern of events going on in his head that connected what I'd just said to what he was thinking, it never made sense." Now sober and nearing her 60s, Slick frets over her aging body, campaigns against biomedical research, and feeds the raccoons in her back yard. But she hasn't lost any of her famous feistiness. This is the same woman who flashed her breasts at photographers, pulled her skirt over her head at concerts, and even once, "having ingested the entire contents of the minibar in my hotel room," stuck her fingers up an audience member's nose. Grace Slick may have mellowed, but bless her heart, she's still running off her mouth. --Mary Park From Publishers Weekly Rock chanteuse Grace Slick was a sophomore at the University of Miami when, in 1958, a friend from her Bay-area hometown sent her an article about the new San Francisco scene?a world of "marijuana, rock music and strange but pleasantly artistic beatnik behavior." Intrigued, Slick returned home and threw herself into a counterculture that was distinctly at odds with her post-war middle-class upbringing. After playing in a popular local band for a few years, she joined the front ranks of '60s rock icons when she was invited to sing for the already-prominent band Jefferson Airplane, recording hits like "White Rabbit" and "Somebody to Love" that helped to define the kaleidoscopic rock world of the 1960s. Here, Slick unabashedly details her lon

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