The Romans: From Village to Empire

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Description

Author: Boatwright, Mary T.

Number Of Pages: 544

EAN: 9780195118759

Release Date: 27-01-2004

Languages: English

Item Condition: UsedGood

Binding: Hardcover

Details: Product Description How did a single village community in the Italian peninsula eventually become one of the mightiest imperial powers the world has ever known? In The Romans, Mary T. Boatwright, Daniel Gargola, and Richard J.A. Talbert tackle this question as they guide readers through a comprehensive sweep of Roman history, ranging from the prehistoric settlements to the age of Constantine. Vividly written and attractively designed with almost 100 illustrations, The Romans expertly unfolds Rome's remarkable evolution from village, to monarchy and then republic, and finally to one-man rule by an emperor whose power at its peak stretched from Scotland to Iraq and the Nile Valley. Firmly grounded in ancient literary and material sources, the book captures and analyzes the outstanding political and military landmarks--from the Punic Wars, to Caesar's conquest of Gaul and his crossing of the Rubicon, to the victory of Octavian over Mark Antony, to Constantine's adoption of Christianity. Here too are some of the most fascinating individuals ever to walk across the world stage, including Hannibal, Mithridates, Pompey, Cicero, Cleopatra, Augustus, Livia, Nero, Marcus Aurelius, and Shapur. The authors bring to life many aspects of Rome's cultural and social history, from the role of women, to literature, entertainments, town-planning, portraiture, and religion. The book incorporates more than 30 maps, mostly produced by the Ancient World Mapping Center; in addition, 22 boxes interspersed throughout feature varied excerpts of writings by Romans themselves. Rome's story is one of history's most remarkable chronicles. The Romans gives marvelous fresh insight into a people's truly monumental achievement--their ambition, glory, and suffering. From Publishers Weekly The rise and fall of Rome as an ancient world power continues to fascinate, especially in a world where people often draw comparisons between the Roman Empire and the United States in the 21st century. In an elegantly written and beautifully crafted study, three recognized historians of ancient Rome provide a first-rate and definitive history of the city from its prehistory to its rise and fall as the ancient world's dominant power. Drawing on a wide range of primary sources, Boatwright and her coauthors recreate the bustling commerce of the earliest villages of Italy in the eighth century B.C., the rapidly shifting political fortunes of leaders in the move from monarchy through republic to empire and the compelling personalities of poets and emperors. Since much of Roman history is the history of its leaders, the authors devote a good deal of attention to the lives and works of men ranging from the Gracchus twins (Tiberius and Gaius) to Pompey, Caesar and Nero. History comes alive in the many illustrations accompanying the text. In addition, each chapter features boxed excerpts from primary sources that illumine particular historical events. A time line, a glossary of important Roman terms and a selected reading list of primary sources increase the value of this magnificent volume, which anyone interested in the history of Rome will return to over and over. Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. From Booklist Aimed at college graduates who may have missed the introductory course on Roman history, this survey ably lays a foundation for its readers. At various points, the authors introduce topics attractive to such an audience, including women's status, religion, and literature, but their central emphasis is the organization of the Roman state. Its complicated composition, which contributed to the periodic civil wars that are mileposts in Roman history, is kept regularly in view, and assists in structuring the authors' narratives about victors such as Sulla, Octavian, Vespasian, or Constantine. Losers, such as the Gracchus brothers, were often viewed negatively in surviving ancient writings, so the authors ensure aw

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